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(Credit: Microsoft Blog)

Often if you hit a good writing flow, but have to leave your work, you'll add a few notes at the bottom of the page to help you pick up where you left off.

Microsoft Word is testing a new feature in Editor, the AI-powered writing assistant, that can turn Word document notes into a to-do list.

In a blog post, Microsoft said users will soon be able to type "TODO: finish this section" or

"<<insert closing here>>", for example, and Word will recognize the items as to-dos. Editor will recognize the text and create a list. Think along the lines of entering a formula into Excel.

SEE: Microsoft updates To-Do app with 'Planned' smart lists that display all tasks by due date

"When you come back to the document, you'll see a list of your remaining to-dos, and you can click each one to navigate back to the right spot," Microsoft said.

You can tag other people in your to-do list, similarly to social media, with an "@" sign. Word will send them an email notification with a "deep link" to the relevant place in the document.

Tagged users can reply to the notification with their contribution, and it'll be inserted directly into the document. It's along the lines of how Google Docs' sharing feature works

"In the next few months, Word will use Microsoft Search to suggest content for a to-do like '<<insert chart of quarterly sales figures>>'. You will be able to pick from the results and insert content from another document with a single click," the company said.

The new to-do list feature is headed for Windows tests in the next few weeks. Office365 users can expect to see it live soon afterward. Microsoft plans to launch for other Office apps later.

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Takeaways

  1. Microsoft is working on a new feature in its AI Editor to automatically create to-do lists within documents in Word.
  2. The new feature will also let users tag each other to add information to a document. The tagged person will get an email where they can directly insert text into the document.

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Shelby is an Associate Writer for CNET's Download.com. She served as Editor in Chief for the Louisville Cardinal newspaper at the University of Louisville. She interned as Creative Non-Fiction Editor for Miracle Monocle literary magazine. Her work appears in Glass Mountain Magazine, Bookends Review, Soundings East, and on Louisville.com. Her cat, Puck, is the best cat ever.